Summer Heat and Chronic Illnesses

Peer Health can connect you with a personalized peer community to share provider recommendations, treatment options, and define your best life. Sign up for our beta and newsletter today.


The summer is really ramping up, and that means it’s time to take these climbing temperatures seriously. While the heat can certainly be uncomfortable, it’s also a major health hazard. Particularly young or older individuals, as well as people with compromised immune systems and health concerns are at the highest risk for heat-related illnesses. But how do you balance the best months of the year with your own well-being?

Be Proactive

Are you going on any vacations over the summer months? It’s easy to forget to pack all the necessaries, such as high SPF sunscreen and appropriate headwear, in the rush. Make sure you take a look at the weather forecast in your destination to know what to expect. Higher elevations can often have a harsher effect, like in Denver. If you plan on getting outside for activities while you’re in town, make sure you have the appropriate hats, sweat-proof sunscreens, and reusable water bottles. Heat-related illnesses are no joke.

Stay Hydrated

Speaking of those reusable water bottles, make sure you’re drinking plenty of water all season long. While the exact amount you’ll need to consume will depend on your body size, health issues, and activity levels, it’s a good idea to always have water on hand. That way you’re never without options when you start feeling the effects of the sun. If you find yourself with chapped lips, dry skin and a lower than usual appetite, chances are good that you could use a few extra sips of water in your day.

Plan Your Days

Are you planning some trips to an outdoor venue or event? If possible, attempt to plan your forays for the cooler hours of the day. This is generally earlier in the morning and later in the evening after the sun has begun to set. High noon sun exposure can be difficult if your skin is sensitive or if you’re prone to getting heat exhaustion. Stepping inside an air-conditioned restaurant for a bite to eat can give you the opportunity to cool down. Even a bit of shade can reduce the temperatures by a decent amount, but it’s not always available in crowded spots. Know your options when you enter places like zoos and public gardens.


Peer Health can connect you with a personalized peer community to share provider recommendations, treatment options, and define your best life. Sign up for our beta and newsletter today.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s